Startup Professionals Musings

8 Processes Define A Business Rather Than A Hobby

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Published Jan 14, 2016

As a startup investor, I often see business proposals looking for funding that really look like expensive hobbies looking for donations. I recognize that entrepreneurs tend to substitute vision and passion for formal processes, but no discipline or process in building something new is a sure way to spend money, rather than see any return and build a self-sustaining business.

I’m not suggesting that you model your startup after the complex corporate organizations you hated in your last job, but there are at least eight key functions and activities that every investor expects to find in a startup proposal with any real potential to change the world. Each of these requires some ongoing effort, so I expect at least a rudimentary process associated with each:

  1. Record of spending and business assets. I still see entrepreneurs who spend money and time for months on a new business idea without any separation of personal and business funds, and any formal accounting system for their new business. This is the first business process that every startup needs, that I wouldn’t expect to find for a hobby.

  2. Managing to specific goals, priorities, and a plan. Technologists building cool new platforms, just because they can, won’t find investor interest. Entrepreneurs need to document a process of responding to a market need, sizing opportunity, assigning a specific business model, and planning for marketing, sales, and customer satisfaction.

  3. Solution development and delivery. Products and services for a business need to be attuned to customer requirements, cost and quality tradeoffs, with milestones for pricing and completion. Typically some production and delivery is outsourced, requiring formal contracts and documentation. Hobbies are developed ad-hoc, driven by personal needs.

  4. Preparation and management of funding. Even if you are not requesting outside funding, I would expect a clear process for sourcing and managing the investment you plan to apply. External investors expect a documented business plan, with clear targets on funding needed, use of funds, revenue projections, return potential, and exit strategy.

  5. Team building status and plan. Solo entrepreneurs, with a team of helpers, will be assumed to be a hobby rather than a business. I recommend every startup plan for at least two or three decision level team members, and at least a couple of highly-qualified external advisors. Show that you have a process to hire, fire, and train others as required.

  6. Formalize the use of tools and information technology. Productivity and repeatability is the hallmark of a good business, whereas a hobby usually assumes everything is custom built and personal. I look for business startups to already have their website up and running, administrative tools purchased, and basic procedures automated.

  7. Customer receivables collection and vendor payments. These are critical processes for any business, so they need to be implemented even before investor requests are sized or solicited. For progress and success assessment, each of these needs some metrics defined, a training plan, and responsibility assignments within your team.

  8. Marketing, sales, support, and service operations. I’m assuming that most of you will see these as intuitively obvious elements of a business, but not needed for a hobby. Yet I continue to get funding requests that never mention any specific plans or costs to be associated with these elements. No mention usually means no plan and not competitive.

For all of these, your objective should always be a minimum viable process to start, with the expectation that each will be enhanced and pivoted as you learn from customers and competition that works and what doesn’t. The key is to be proactive, rather than assuming that you can react to each crisis as it happens. Customers today are easy to lose, and expensive to replace.

It’s a myth in the startup world that not having processes makes you more competitive. In my experience, no defined process means unable to respond in a timely fashion, unpredictable quality, and high operating costs. None of these are attractive to investors, and jeopardize the success of even the best initial idea. A hobby may take your idea to a product, but a startup has to take the idea to a business.


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ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Martin Zwilling

Marty Zwilling‘s passion is nurturing the development of entrepreneurs by providing first-hand mentoring, funding assistance, and business plan development. He is the Founder and CEO of Startup Professionals, a company that provides products and services to startup founders and small business owners.

He writes a daily blog for entrepreneurs, and dispenses advice on the subject of startups to a large online audience of over 550,000 Twitter followers. He is also a regular contributor to Forbes, Harvard Business Review, Business Insider, and the Huffington Post. He also published two books, “Do You Have What It Takes To Be An Entrepreneur?” and “Attracting an Angel.”